Four Valentine’s Day Tips For Pets


Valentine’s Day Tips for Pets!

Roses are red, violets are blue, sugar is sweet and so are our pets! Okay, that doesn’t rhyme, but all pet parents can agree that our feline and canine counterparts are well-loved. It’s important to remember though that the ways we love our fellow humans are not good ways to love our pets.

Valentine’s Day is famous for chocolates, poetry, roses, and delectable candies. These treats can be dangerous for our pets though, so take precautions to keep your pets safe and healthy.

1. Keep the chocolates out of reach (and maybe out of smell). Chocolates are extremely toxic to cats and dogs—especially dark chocolate. If your pets ingest chocolate, you’ll want to contact the poison control center immediately. This chocolate warning is not just limited to chocolate bars—anything with baker’s chocolate, or chocolate covered foods are also dangerous. Refrigerate the leftover chocolate-covered strawberries so Fido doesn’t accidentally get hold of them.

2. Roses present a thorny situation. Digestion of roses isn’t deadly—though it can produce stomach and digestive upset in our pets. The thorny stems or roses can cause some serious damage though—even an obstruction. The thorns can also get lodged in paws or the mouth and cause incredible pain. Keep the roses out of reach—and all the other flowers for that matter. Perhaps you’re gifted some lilies and daisies instead of traditional roses. Lilies can actually be deadly and you’ll want to get an emergency vet ASAP if your pet ingests these.

3. Xylitol is dangerously sweet. In all seriousness, this sugar substitute is dangerous to our pets. It can cause liver failure in dogs, and it causes pets’ blood sugar levels to drop to dangerously low levels. What do you find xylitol in? Gum and breath mints are a staple for a big date with your special someone on Valentine’s Day—but they are some of the biggest culprits for xylitol. Keep the mints tucked in your purse or pocket and out-of-reach of your pets.

4. Sweet letters or hand-written poems are sweet mementos to give to your special someone, but if your dog jumps on counters, he may get hold of that paper. When dogs eat paper—a behavior more common in puppies that have yet to be trained out of the habit—the product can get lodged in their digestive tract and may result in a large vet expense for you. Having pet insurance can help cover these costs, but its best to avoid the occurrence all together with some great training and by keeping the sentimental paper gifts out of pets reach.

We at PetFirst love our furry friends—and we know you pet parents do too! Share the love with your, just don’t share the chocolates and flowers. Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

About PetFirst
PetFirst is the fastest growing pet insurer in North America offering easy-to-understand lifelong coverage for dogs and cats. PetFirst’s comprehensive coverage is unique in the industry providing simplified policies with coverage for hereditary, chronic and breed-specific conditions with no per-diagnosis limits. PetFirst polices are underwritten by American Alternative Insurance Corporation (Munich Re) which is rated by A.M. Best as A+.  Additional services are underwritten by Lloyd’s.  For more information about PetFirst pet insurance, visit www.petfirst.com or call 855-270-7387.



One thought on “Four Valentine’s Day Tips For Pets

  1. Paige Smith

    This article really points out a lot of points that I have never really thought about before. These are simple things that sometimes we often forget. I have never thought about my pets getting hurt on my roses, because I have them vased in water. Common things like this need to be looked at a little more closely.

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